News: Full list of 2019 Churchill Fellows

Published: 7 Mar 2019

News: Full list of 2019 Churchill Fellows

Today we announce 150 new Churchill Fellows. Over the next 12 months, they will travel the world and research cutting-edge solutions to important topical issues facing UK society.

Read more about the 2019 Churchill Fellows

Together, they will travel to 65 countries across six continents. The countries highlighted in orange below will all be visited by 2019 Churchill Fellows. 

Countries 2019 Fellows will travel to

Here is the full list of 2019 Fellows.

Artists & makers Education Emergency services Enterprise
Environment, conservation & sustainable living Healthcare Migration Nursing & Allied Health Professions
Rural living Science, technology & engineering Suicide Open

Artists & makers

  • Peter Matthews, a visual artist from Leicestershire, will travel to the USA to research support for artists on the autistic spectrum. He will use his findings to help autistic artists in the UK gain greater exposure for their work.
  • Fabian Wadsworth, a university professor from Durham, will travel to Germany, Iceland and the USA to learn from glass artists producing large scale works inspired by volcanoes. His experiences will provide inspiration for a glass exhibition in the UK.
  • Joe Bazalgette Zanetti, a glass artist and designer from London, will travel to the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy and Sweden to research approaches to glassmaking that incorporate the use of digital technologies. He will use his findings to create opportunities for tech practitioners to collaborate with traditional craftspeople.
  • Jeremy Hobbs, a stonemason from Trowbridge, will travel to Italy to study the conservation of classical figurative sculpture. He will share the knowledge he gains with colleagues working in the conservation industry.
  • Chloe Lightfoot, a diamond mounter from Ashford, will travel to France, Germany, Switzerland and Russia to learn from craftsmen working with diamonds. She will use her findings to inspire the next generation of jewellers in the UK.
  • Linda Brothwell, an artist from Bristol, will travel to Japan to study tool making and the life cycle of tools within Japanese culture. She will share findings through lectures and workshops.
  • Isatu Hyde, a potter and designer from Shropshire, will travel to Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal and Sierra Leone to study West African craft pottery techniques and traditions. She will share her findings through workshops and talks, with the aim of promoting greater diversity in UK crafts.

Education

  • David Stanley, a charity director from Essex, will travel to the USA to study approaches to music education for people with learning disabilities. He will use his findings to train others to make opportunities to learn and perform music more accessible.
  • Richard Jeffries, a choral conductor and music educator from Derbyshire, will travel to Finland, Canada and the USA to study the impact of choral singing on educational development. He will use his findings to develop new music education projects.
  • Ian Kell, a secondary school teacher from Gateshead, will travel to Estonia, Australia and New Zealand to explore models of e-learning. He intends to use his findings to develop projects for the benefit of children who are excluded from mainstream education due to health, geographical or social reasons.
  • Heba Al-Jayoosi, an assistant headteacher from London, will travel to the USA to explore approaches to including autistic students in mainstream education. She will use her findings to inform a pilot project in her own school.
  • Tom Garry, a teacher from London, will travel to the USA to research professional development for new teachers. He will share the best practice he observes across UK schools.
  • Angela Nartey, an education policy worker from Croydon, will travel to the USA to investigate approaches to widening access to higher education. She will seek to use her findings to inform pilot projects by universities aimed at increasing recruitment among students from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Angela's Fellowship is supported by The Eranda Rothschild Foundation.
  • Joshua Hillis, an educator from Lancashire, will travel to Israel, Jordan and the State of Palestine to learn how schools there teach the conflict in the Middle East. His findings will inform resources to support teachers in UK faith schools to teach this controversial topic.
  • Jessica Agboola, a recent university graduate from Kent, will travel to the USA to research grassroots initiatives supporting university students of African and Caribbean descent. She will work with UK think tanks to use her findings to offer improved support for students in the UK.
  • Julia Voce, a teaching assistant from Brighton, will travel to Argentina, Guatemala and the USA to study hospital clowning. She plans to translate her observations into a form of clown care for use by teaching assistants working with children with emotional and behavioural challenges.
  • Paul Middleton, a teacher from St Albans, will travel to Switzerland, Finland and Singapore to investigate approaches to supporting the wellbeing of new teachers. He will share his learning to help educational institutions improve their retention of new teachers.

Emergency services: crisis prevention, response and recovery

  • Patrick Radbourne, a policy worker from London, will travel to Canada, the USA, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and Italy to study approaches to international policing assistance. He will use his findings to advocate for reform of the UK's approach to international policing assistance. Patrick's Fellowship is supported by Mr Björn Savén.
  • William Willson, from London, and a Community Engagement Officer for the Metropolitan Police, will travel to Mexico and Peru to research strategies for addressing the forced labour of young people by gangs. He will use his findings to inform the response of the UK police and youth sector to the exploitation of young people through 'county lines'. William's Fellowship is supported by Mr Björn Savén.
  • Vincent Romano, a paramedic from Penrith, will travel to Canada and the USA to research mental health support for ambulance workers. He will use his findings to develop a peer support service for UK ambulance workers. Vincent's Fellowship is supported by Mr Björn Savén.
  • Sally-Ann Ashton, a lecturer from Salford, will travel to the USA to research strategies for preventing young people from becoming involved in gang violence. Her findings will inform UK police forces' work with young people involved in or at risk of becoming involved in gang crime.
  • Philip Robinson, a police inspector from Northern Ireland, will travel to the USA to research missing persons investigations. He will seek to use his findings to inform the work of police in the UK.
  • Joanne Mildenhall, a paramedic from Swindon, will travel to Australia and New Zealand to investigate support for emergency services staff's mental wellbeing after witnessing traumatic events. She will use her findings to create innovative ways of supporting frontline staff and to input into the development of the UK ambulance services' first mental health strategy and policy.
  • Melvin Hartley, a council worker from Portsmouth, will travel to the Netherlands, Germany and the USA to investigate the management of spontaneous volunteers at emergency incidents. He will seek to use his findings to inform response planning in the UK. Melvin's Fellowship is supported by Mr Björn Savén.
  • Gary Beautridge, a police officer from Maidstone, will travel to the USA to investigate the use of artificial intelligence tools in policing. He will use his findings to inform debates around managing public confidence in the UK police's use of artificial intelligence. Gary's Fellowship is supported by DLA Piper.
  • James Rowlands, a researcher and domestic violence worker from Brighton, will travel to Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA to study ways of improving responses to intimate partner homicide. He will use his findings to inform how these deaths are reviewed in the UK.
  • James Linehan, a firefighter from Bristol, will travel to Sweden and the USA to research approaches to preventing firefighters developing cancer as a result of exposure to toxic chemicals. He will use his findings to help educate UK firefighters to protect their health. James' Fellowship is supported by Mr Björn Savén.
  • Christian Wiggin, a paramedic from Devon, will travel to Australia to study critical care delivered by paramedics. He will use his findings to support the career development of paramedics in the UK. Christian's Fellowship is supported by DLA Piper.
  • Mark Corbin, from Wolverhampton, and Key Route Network Manager at Transport for West Midlands and chair of the National Traffic Managers Forum, will travel to Canada, Finland and Sweden to study approaches to improving the resilience of roads to severe winter conditions. He will share his findings with transport authorities in the UK.

Enterprise: supporting social impact

This category is supported by The Rank Foundation.

  • A Fellow, who wishes to remain anonymous, will to travel to the USA to investigate effective development programmes for the empowerment of young women from ethnic minorities through the education system. They will use their findings to create solutions that tackle obstacles to personal, academic and social success for young women from diverse backgrounds in the UK.
  • Kenny Lieske, from York, and a non-executive director of a community interest company, will travel to the USA to investigate how technology utilised by the tourism sector can be harnessed for social good. He will use his findings to develop employment opportunities for homeless people in the UK.
  • Joanna Heywood, from London, and Relationships Director at social impact investor Big Society Capital, will travel to Bolivia and Peru to explore how community-owned food businesses can be successfully scaled up for public benefit. She will share her findings with community-owned food businesses in the UK.
  • David Goodfellow, a social entrepreneur from London, will travel to the USA to explore the use of empty properties and spaces by third sector organisations. He will share his findings through presentations and a short film.
  • Josh Babarinde, from London, and the founder and chief executive of a social enterprise, will travel to Mexico and the USA to investigate employment programmes for young ex-offenders. He will use his findings to scale up his social enterprise to support more young people in the UK into work and away from criminality.
  • Simon Shaw, a food programme coordinator from London, will travel to Belgium, France, Italy, South Korea and Spain to research social enterprises and other initiatives that support older people's access to food. His findings will inform the development of meals on wheels programmes in the UK.
  • Alice Williams, a social entrepreneur from Romford, will travel to South Africa and the USA to explore how social enterprise models can transform the lives of disadvantaged women. She will use her findings to expand her own social enterprise into other parts of the UK.
  • Abi Nolan, a social entrepreneur from London, will travel to Rwanda to learn from organisations using yoga as a therapeutic mental health intervention. She will use her findings to develop a community-based mental health programme for socially isolated women and girls.
  • Tom Shirley, a data analyst and designer from London, will travel to Finland, the Netherlands and the USA to investigate how the use of data analysis and innovative funding models can be used to increase the sustainability of social enterprises. He will share his findings through training and talks for social enterprises in the UK.
  • Caroline Diehl, from London, and the chairman of a television channel, will travel to India and the USA to investigate innovative models of financing social impact through the media. She will use her findings to influence UK media outlets to encourage democratic engagement and greater social awareness.
  • Oli Monks, from London, and the founder of an organisation creating co-working spaces for autistic people, will travel to Canada, Denmark and the USA to research approaches to supporting neurodiversity in the workplace. His findings will inform the development of co-working spaces suitable for neurodiverse people in five UK cities.
  • Clara Widdison, a policy advisor from London, will travel to Canada and the USA to research multifunctional community food hubs. She will use her findings to support UK food banks and other organisations addressing food insecurity to deliver greater community benefit.
  • Rebecca McCartney, from London, and Investment Director at social impact investor Big Society Capital, will travel to Canada, India, Singapore and the USA to explore how socially motivated capital can be directed to positively impact disadvantaged people and places. She will use her findings to influence the use of major investments to improve the lives of people in the UK.
  • Lindsay Marsden, from London, and Director of Partnerships & Fundraising at UK Youth, will travel to Australia, Canada and the USA to understand how a younger generation of philanthropists are changing the fundraising landscape. She will use her findings to advise grant-funding organisations on new approaches, technologies and innovations that could enable them to better support communities in the UK.
  • Julia Slay, from London, and Assistant Director of Communities and Social Policy at the Greater London Authority (GLA), will travel to Australia, Canada and the USA to investigate the role of anchor institutions - organisations based in a city or region indefinitely - in tackling social and economic disadvantage. She will share her findings across local and regional government, the NHS and London's major anchor institutions.
  • Gary Fawdrey, from London, and programme coordinator at UK innovation foundation Nesta, will travel to Australia, New Zealand and Samoa to investigate how social enterprises can increase the prosperity of rural and marginalised communities. He will use his findings to develop bottom-up approaches to developing social enterprises where the beneficiaries of programmes play a leading role in their design.
  • Deborah Marshall, an embalmer from Blackburn, will travel to Canada and New Zealand to investigate affordable funeral care. She will use her findings to create a social enterprise offering affordable funeral plans to people in poverty and to lobby for greater regulation in the funeral industry in the UK.
  • Jacqueline Cassidy, a charity worker from Edinburgh, will travel to Japan, Singapore and the USA to research co-located intergenerational child and elder care settings. She will use her findings to create a social enterprise that supports the needs of both deprived children and older people in the UK.
  • Lorraine Close, from Edinburgh, and Director at Edinburgh Community Yoga, will travel to Canada, Kenya and the USA to investigate sustainable business models for not-for-profit organisations delivering trauma-informed yoga. She will use her findings to develop a programme of yoga-based therapy in Scotland to support military veterans and women who have experienced trauma.

Environment, conservation & sustainable living

  • John Harrison, from South Shields, and Executive lead for the homeless charity Emmaus North East, will travel to Belgium, Canada, Italy, Norway and The Netherlands to investigate how involvement in farming practices can improve wellbeing. He will use his findings to implement a project in the UK aimed at supporting homeless people's mental health and offering them pathways back into employment.
  • Bex Lynam, from York, and Marine Advocacy Officer for Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, will travel to Canada and the USA to investigate approaches to involving members of the public in conservation projects. She will use her findings to improve awareness and understanding of marine mammals in UK waters.
  • Emma Hookham, a charity worker from London, will travel to Denmark, Germany, Norway, Sweden and The Netherlands to explore approaches to tackling air pollution through promoting low-polluting modes of transport. To reduce her own carbon footprint, she will be making this 2,000-mile journey by bicycle. She will share her findings with schools and environmental groups in the UK. Emma's Fellowship is supported by The Frank Jackson Foundation.
  • Morgan Lewis, an architect from London, will travel to Belgium, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands and Turkey to investigate environmentally sustainable approaches to the manufacture, use and transport of building goods. He will use his findings to advocate for more sustainable practices in the UK's construction industry.
  • Luke Sandford, a specialist in infrastructure finance from London, will travel to Denmark, Germany, Japan and Sweden to investigate community-led energy projects. He will use his findings to influence energy policy in the UK. Luke's Fellowship is supported by The Frank Jackson Foundation.
  • Katherine Walsh, an environmental specialist from Nantwich, Cheshire, will travel to Germany and Switzerland to assess approaches to lynx and wildcat reintroduction. Her findings will inform the production of practical reintroduction guidelines for the species tailored to the UK.
  • Clare Owens, from Liverpool, and the co-founder of an arts and food community organisation, will travel to France and the USA to study participatory neighbourhood schemes. She will use her findings to support social enterprises to reinvigorate deprived communities in the UK.
  • Keri Langridge, a conservation worker from the Scottish Highlands, will travel to France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain and Switzerland to study approaches to preventing cross-breeding between wildcats and domestic cats. She will use her findings to inform efforts to reintroduce wildcats to Scotland.
  • Jonathan Reeves, a conservationist from Bristol, will travel to Japan and South Korea to explore the health benefits of spending time in forests. He will use his findings to advocate for nature-based health interventions in the UK.
  • Mark Parry, a marine botanist from Plymouth, will travel to Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Timor-Leste and the United Arab Emirates to research seagrass conservation and restoration. He will use his findings to aid the management of seagrass areas in the UK.
  • Bryony Allwood, a qualified medical herbalist from Hull, will travel to France, Ireland and Australia to explore sustainable, small-scale herb farming. She will develop a pilot project in the UK based on her findings.

Healthcare: innovations for the twenty-first century

  • Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas, a medical consultant from Cambridge, will travel to the USA to study the treatment of infections following organ transplants. She will use her findings to make the case for the creation of a dedicated transplant infection service in the UK.
  • Ian Sabroe, a clinician and researcher from Sheffield, will travel to the USA to investigate the benefits of incorporating humanities learning into medical education. He will use his findings to influence medical education policy in the UK.
  • Anthony Howard, an orthopaedic surgeon from Harrogate, will travel to Brazil and Rwanda to investigate the benefits of simple, inexpensive orthopaedic practices. His findings will inform the development of a pilot project in the UK.
  • Rebecca Jarvis, a health policy worker from London, will travel to Japan and New Zealand to research support for older people that allows them to remain in their own home. She will share her findings in the UK with NHS organisations and charities supporting older people.
  • Dimitri Varsamis, a health policy worker from London, will travel to Australia, New Zealand and the USA to explore the use of digital technology in primary healthcare. He will use his findings to influence how patients in the UK access care from their GPs.
  • Sophie Redlin, a general practitioner from London, will travel to Canada and the USA to investigate 'talking circles', a practice aimed at empowering communities to collectively support individuals experiencing mental health issues. She will share her findings in the UK through publishing articles and presenting at conferences.
  • Mars Skae, a medical consultant from Manchester, will travel to the Netherlands and the USA to study responses to childhood obesity. She will use her findings to inform strategies for tackling childhood obesity in the UK.
  • Rachel Gibbs, from Belfast, and an Assistant Director at South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust, will travel to Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA to study health care services in prison that involve prisoners in their design. She will use her findings to develop services in Northern Ireland that treat offenders with greater respect and dignity and thus support rehabilitation.
  • Evelyn Sharp, a therapist from Brighton, will travel to the USA to explore the use of the performing arts to support psychological recovery from trauma. She will seek to use her findings to develop a pilot project for people affected by domestic abuse in the UK.
  • Sally Coulthard, a serving reservist from Bath, will travel to Denmark and Sweden to investigate horticultural therapy for armed forces personnel with mental health issues. She will use her findings to develop a network of veterans-friendly gardens in the UK.
  • Rosa Crunkhorn, a doctor from Birmingham, will travel to France and the USA to research best practice in vestibular rehabilitation, the treatment of problems with the part of the inner ear responsible for balance. She will use her findings to develop good practice guidance for vestibular rehabilitation for children.

Migration: living well together

This category is supported by The Linbury Trust.

  • Rosie Carter, a policy worker from London, will travel to Germany and the USA to study approaches to migrant integration in small towns. Her findings will inform engagement around the issue of migration with small town communities in the UK.
  • Ella Johnson, a policy worker from London, will travel to Italy and Sweden to research maternal healthcare for migrants. She will seek to use her findings to inform UK health policy.
  • Fay Douglas, a lawyer from London, will travel to Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago to conduct genealogical research on the Windrush generation. Her findings will be used to help descendants of the Windrush generation to trace their family history.
  • Emily Miller, an educator from London, will travel to Belgium, France, Germany and the USA to explore how museums can contribute to debates around immigration. Her findings will inform the development of the UK's first national migration museum.
  • Rosemary Brown, a charity worker from London, will travel to Greece and Ireland to research support for refugees and migrants to learn their host country's language. She will seek to use her findings to develop a pilot project aimed at supporting migrant integration.
  • Saeida Rouass, a writer and policy worker from London, will travel to the USA to explore why women join violent extremist movements. She will present her findings to public sector and civil society organisations involved in countering extremism in the UK.
  • Mohammed Dhalech, from Carlisle, and a member of the British Mountaineering Council Equity group, will travel to Canada and the USA to study approaches to increasing engagement in outdoor activities among Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities. He will share his findings with organisations promoting outdoor activities in the UK.
  • Clare Daly, an advocacy worker from Inverness, will travel to Canada and Norway to explore integration for migrants and refugees in rural areas. She will use her findings to inform support for migrants in the Scottish Highlands.
  • Astrid Fairclough, a civil servant from Sevenoaks, will travel to Australia, Egypt, Kenya and Sierra Leone to explore support for health professionals who are migrants from countries where FGM is prevalent. She will share her findings with healthcare leaders in the UK.
  • Debbie Ariyo, a charity chief executive from Croydon, will travel to Ghana and Thailand to research how communities can support children who are victims of human trafficking. She will use her findings to develop new models of community engagement for trafficking victims in the UK.

Nursing & Allied Health Professions

This category is supported by The Burdett Trust for NursingFoNS Centre for Nursing Innovation and the Royal College of Nursing.

  • Pamela Page, an adult critical care nurse and academic from Chelmsford, will travel to Australia, New Zealand and the USA to investigate support for people who have survived a critical illness. Her findings will inform training for nurses in the UK.
  • Eleanor Corcoran, a senior research nurse from London, will travel to Australia to research the use of ultrasound by nurses working in critical care. She will use her findings to advocate for further investment into ultrasound technology for diagnosing and treating critically ill patients in the UK.
  • Sarah Dewhurst, an oncology physiotherapist from London, will travel to Australia, New Zealand and Switzerland to investigate the role of physical activity in improving outcomes for cancer patients. She will use her findings to influence health policy in the UK.
  • Tai Frater, an occupational therapist from Uxbridge, will travel to Canada, New Zealand and the USA to explore the use of parent coaching within children's occupational therapy practice. She will share her findings with occupational therapists in the UK.
  • Ruth Oshikanlu, a nurse from London, will travel to Australia and the USA to investigate support for young people with adverse childhood experiences. She will use her findings to develop a toolkit for health professionals working with young people who have experienced trauma.
  • Roxy Afzal, a neonatal intensive care nurse from Manchester, will travel to Canada and the USA to explore best practice in neonatal organ donation. She will use her findings to develop practices to support UK health professionals to confidently and competently offer the option of organ donation to families of end-of-life babies.
  • Leah Macaden, a nursing lecturer from Inverness, will travel to India, Singapore and the USA to investigate training for healthcare professionals working with people with dementia. She will use her findings to create new teaching modules for nursing students in the UK.
  • Katrina Rogers, a speech and language therapist from Kent, will travel to Brazil and the USA to investigate treatment for children who have difficulty swallowing. She will use her findings to inform a multidisciplinary approach to this issue in the UK.
  • Elaine Strachan-Hall, a chief nurse from Banbury, will travel to Australia, Finland, Japan, Macau and New Zealand to investigate digital technology in nursing. She will use her findings to inform debates around the use of robots and artificial intelligence in UK health care.
  • Claire Lewis, from Merthyr Tydfil, and Lead Nurse Coordinator for Bowel Screening Wales, will travel to Australia, New Zealand and the USA to research nurse endoscopist training. She will use her findings to inform improvements in bowel screening diagnostic services.
  • Hannah Morley, a physiotherapist from Hereford, will travel to Australia and New Zealand to investigate the role of advanced physiotherapy practitioners in healthcare. She will use her findings to improve the training and working practices of physiotherapists in the UK.

Rural living: strengthening countryside communities

This category is supported by The Prince's Countryside Fund.

  • Howard Nelson, from Grantham, and the Chief Operating Officer of a group of academy schools in Norfolk, will travel to Canada to investigate how small, rural schools can become sustainable. He will use his findings to develop new approaches for use by schools in the UK.
  • Ian Brown, from Northumberland, and Chair of the Forestry Commission's North East Forestry and Woodland Advisory Committee, will travel to Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, Kenya, South Africa and Tanzania to explore the benefits of planting trees on farmland. He will share his findings with the farming and forestry sectors in the UK.
  • Jo Rhodes, from North Yorkshire, and the director of a community and business hub, will travel to the USA and Pembrokeshire to study rural timebanking schemes, alternative currency systems where the unit of account is the time a person spends on a task or activity. She will share her findings with public bodies and voluntary organisations based in rural areas of the UK.
  • Rima Berry, a charity worker from North Yorkshire, will travel to the USA to study models of affordable housing in protected rural areas. She will use her findings to influence Yorkshire Dales National Park planning policies.
  • Rory Weal, a policy worker from London, will travel to the USA to study responses to homelessness in rural communities. He will use his findings to raise awareness of this issue and seek to influence policy in the UK.
  • Tobias Phibbs, a rural policy worker from London, will travel to the USA to explore how small rural communities can develop resilience. He will share his findings with community leaders in rural areas of the UK.
  • Lois Mansfield, a lecturer from Cumbria, will travel to Japan to research the use of place-based cultural capital as a tool for rural development. She will seek to identify development opportunities for struggling upland economies in the UK.
  • Ruth Leahy, a council worker from Cumbria, will travel to the USA to explore strategies aimed at increasing the number of young people living and working in rural areas. She will use her findings to develop a pilot project in the UK.
  • Mary Houston, from Kendal, and the manager of an organic farm and mental health charity, will travel to Norway, the Netherlands and the USA to research mental health services based on farms. She aims to use her findings to develop new models of mental health support in rural areas.
  • Lorraine Coe, a nurse from the Scottish Highlands, will travel to Japan to study new technology used in health and social care. She will use her findings to inform the development of care in rural Scotland.
  • Louise Wilson, from Orkney, and Director of Public Health at NHS Orkney, will travel to the Faroe Islands, Finland, Portugal and Sweden to explore approaches to enabling people living in rural areas to have a say on local health policy. She will use her findings to influence health policy in Scotland.
  • Jon Macleod, an artist and crofter from the Isle of Lewis, will travel to Canada to study creative projects that are bringing economic regeneration to small island communities. He will seek to develop new initiatives in his own community that are based on his findings.
  • Tom Cannon, a marketing manager from Maidstone, will travel to Australia, New Zealand, China, Turkey and the USA, to explore how hazelnut farming can help to enhance rural economies. Tom, a farmer's grandson, will share his findings with cobnut growers in Kent.
  • Liz Wilkin, a rural community adviser from Cornwall, will travel to Denmark, the Netherlands and Greece to explore approaches to tackling rural isolation. She will use her findings to establish mechanisms for increasing opportunities for social interaction between people from different rural villages.
  • Matthew Rogers, a classical music conductor and composer from Penzance, will travel to the USA to explore ways of reimagining classical music concerts to meet the expectations of a modern audience. He plans to use his findings to develop new concert styles to be performed for audiences in rural Cornwall.
  • Mari Lloyd-Williams, a palliative care doctor from Denbighshire, will travel to the Faroe Islands, Ireland and the Netherlands to study volunteer-run palliative care services in rural areas. She will use her findings to inform government policy on end of life care. Mari's Fellowship is supported by the Lloyd George Foundation.

Science, technology & engineering

  • Zoe Cadwell, a forensic scientist and lecturer from Bury St Edmunds, will travel to Canada and Australia to study the recovery of finger marks on evidence in criminal investigations that has been buried. She will share the methods she observes with forensic scientists in the UK.
  • Hephzi Tagoe, a scientist and educator from Basildon, will travel to Ghana and Finland to explore informal methods of STEM engagement for disadvantaged young people. She will include a chapter on her travels in a book she is writing on STEM engagement and her findings will inform the development of new activities and resources for use in STEM engagement.
  • Erin Dooley, a healthcare consultant from Leicestershire, will travel to Estonia, Rwanda, Japan and Singapore to research the use of digital technology in health services. She will seek to use her findings to influence health policy in the UK.
  • Rachel Bolton-King, a university professor from Nottingham, will travel to France, South Africa and the USA to investigate the use of technology in gun crime investigations. She will use her findings to advise UK agencies on new approaches to preventing gun crime.
  • Daniel Glaser, a neuroscientist and writer from London, will travel to Canada and the USA to research developments in artificial intelligence, and what this technology can tell us about ourselves. He will share his findings through podcasts and public speaking opportunities.
  • Majella Mccloskey, a policy worker from Belfast, will travel to Canada, the USA and South Africa to investigate the promotion of evidence-based policy at the level of national government. She will use her findings to advocate for more effective public governance in Northern Ireland.
  • Clare Meakin, a museum worker from Edinburgh, will travel to Canada, the USA, Japan and South Korea to explore STEM engagement through museums and formal education. She will use her findings to develop projects aimed at addressing the UK's STEM skills shortage.
  • Rosemary Bamford, a research scientist from Exeter, will travel to Australia to study laboratory techniques that could help to improve understanding of the progression of Alzheimer's disease. She will use her findings to inform future research projects in the UK.
  • Lorna Fergus, a forensic scientist from Oxfordshire, will travel to Canada, Australia and New Zealand to explore approaches to training police in the collection of DNA evidence at crime scenes. She will share her findings with police officers and forensic scientists in the UK.
  • Holli Kimble, an engineer from Bristol, will travel to Angola, Malawi, Rwanda and Tanzania to identify innovative humanitarian projects that could help to inspire girls to pursue careers in STEM. Her findings will inform the development of resources for use in UK classrooms and STEM clubs.
  • Tim Astrop, a palaeontologist from Wrexham, will travel to Canada to study projects inspiring interest in natural history. He will use his findings to improve the visitor experience at the Brymbo Fossil Forest, a UK attraction showcasing 300million year-old fossils. Tim's Fellowship is supported by the Lloyd George Foundation.

Suicide: prevention, intervention and postvention

This category is supported by the Samaritans and the John Armitage Charitable Trust.

  • Naomi Watkins, a counsellor and domestic abuse consultant from Lincoln, will travel to Australia and New Zealand to research suicide prevention programmes for children and young people. She will run workshops based on her findings to train teachers and other professional to recognise and support young people at risk of suicide.
  • Anna Wardley, a communications professional and campaigner from Sheffield, will travel to Australia, Denmark and the USA to explore support for children who lose a parent to suicide. Anna, who lost her own father to suicide, will use her findings to increase awareness of this issue in the UK.
  • Million Joseph, a mental health worker from London, will travel to Canada, the USA, China and Japan to investigate suicide prevention for young people living in inner-cities. He aims to use his findings to develop a pilot project to support young people at risk of suicide in the UK.
  • Yuriko Matsukawa, a charity worker from London, will travel to Australia, Canada and the USA to research suicide prevention for refugees and asylum seekers. She will use her findings to develop a pilot project offering face to face support for displaced people.
  • Sangeeta Mahajan, a mental health activist and educator from London, will travel to Australia and the USA to explore coordinated suicide prevention strategies involving collaborations between health and social care providers. Sangeeta, who lost her own son to suicide, will share her findings with UK organisations involved in suicide prevention.
  • Neil Platt, from Liverpool, and the director of a mental health charity, will travel to Australia to research treatment for people who gamble excessively as a way of coping with bereavement by suicide. He will seek to use his findings to develop a pilot project in the UK.
  • Bob Blemmings, a police officer from Coleraine, will travel to Canada and the USA to research suicide prevention at bridges and other high-risk locations. His findings will inform the training of crisis negotiators involved in suicide prevention in the UK.
  • Oscar Donnelly, from Belfast, and Director of Mental Health Services at Northern Health and Social Care Trust, will travel to Australia and the USA to study approaches to reducing rates of suicide. His findings will inform the development of mental health services in Northern Ireland.
  • Alison Jordan, from Exmouth, and chief executive of a suicide bereavement charity, will travel to the USA to explore innovative approaches to suicide prevention and suicide bereavement. Her findings will be used to inform services in the UK.
  • Lorna Fraser, a charity communications worker from Epsom, will travel to Australia to investigate responsible depictions of suicide in the media. She will use her findings to develop new guidance on reporting on suicides.
  • Ananta Dave, a psychiatrist from Sutton Coldfield, will travel to the USA to research strategies for preventing doctors from taking their own lives. She will seek to use her findings to develop a pilot project in the UK.

Open

  • Graham Ord, a charity worker and veteran from Sunderland, will travel to the USA to investigate how joint commissioning can help to combat homelessness. He will use his findings to lobby councils and non-profit organisations to take a joined-up approach to reducing homelessness in the UK.
  • Hannah Bows, a criminologist from Durham, will travel to the USA to study support for older people who are victims of crime. She will use her findings to develop safeguarding models for older people in England and Wales.
  • Rebecca Ling, an elderly care coordinator from Sheffield, will travel to Canada and Japan to investigate day-services for people with dementia. She will share her findings with dementia groups in the UK.
  • Beatriz Brown, a trainee barrister from London, will travel to South Africa and the USA to to research creative approaches to restorative justice. She will use her findings to advocate for policy change in the UK.
  • Joe Lane, a researcher from London, will travel to Australia to study approaches to upholding workers' rights in the modern labour market. He will use his findings to influence policy on the protection of workers' rights in the UK.
  • Elliott Goat, a journalist from London, will travel to the USA to investigate how digital technology can support workers' rights. He will use his findings to engage young, self-employed workers in organised labour.
  • Emily Niner, an autism participation manager from London, will travel to Australia and New Zealand to investigate support for teenagers following a diagnosis of autism. She will use her findings to develop a toolkit for health professionals working with autistic young people.
  • Natalie Mcguigan, a government communications professional from London, will travel to the USA to investigate approaches to increasing female participation in politics. She will use her findings to develop resources to empower women to run for elected office in the UK.
  • Alice Pease, a parliamentary assistant from London, will travel to Denmark, Norway and Sweden to investigate approaches to eliminating modern slavery in public procurement. She will use her findings to advocate for greater transparency in supply chains in the UK's public sector.
  • Hannah Gousy, a charity worker from London, will travel to Austria, Canada, Spain and the USA to investigate political campaigning strategies for tackling homelessness. She will use her findings to influence policy change around homelessness in the UK.
  • Hannah Paterson, a charity worker from Manchester, will travel to South Africa and the USA to study participatory grant making. She will use her findings to advocate for greater community input in grant-making and to empower local groups to secure funding for socially beneficial projects in the UK.
  • Jadwiga Leigh, a lecturer in social work from Altrincham, will travel to Australia to explore early interventions for children at risk of entering the care system. She will use her findings to inform new services aimed at supporting young parents whose children are at risk of entering care.
  • Susan Sharples, from St Annes-On-Sea, and the founder and director of a community interest company, will travel to Canada and the USA to investigate approaches to protecting adults with learning disabilities from sexual abuse. She will use her findings to develop training materials and other resources for UK organisations working with people with learning disabilities.
  • Lucina Hackman, a forensic anthropologist from Dundee, will travel to Australia and Canada to investigate the effective use of forensic science in the criminal justice system. Her findings will inform policy and planning in forensic science delivery in the UK.
  • Kay Jodrell, a nursing home worker from Torquay, will travel to Australia, Canada and the USA to investigate the application of Montessori methodology in dementia care. She will use her findings to influence dementia care in the UK.
  • Lorna Stabler, a research associate from Cardiff, will travel to Cambodia, India and Japan to research kinship care, where the care for an at-risk child is placed with extended family members. Her findings will inform support for kinship carers in the UK. Lorna's Fellowship is supported by the Lloyd George Foundation.
  • Amin Khan, a boxing trainer from Gloucester, will travel to Cuba and the USA to explore the educational and physical benefits of including boxing in school curriculums. He will use his findings to develop a boxing programme in schools aimed at reducing anti-social behaviour, gang involvement and knife crime.
  • Michael Pugh, a community organiser from London, will travel to Canada, India and the USA to investigate universal basic income. He will use his findings to advocate for policy change in the UK.